Memorial dedicated to coronavirus victims planned for Hull

Plans to create a memorial to people who have died from Covid-19 are being explored in Hull.

A total of 859 people have died after testing positive for Covid in Hull Royal Infirmary and Castle Hill hospitals since the start of the pandemic last year.

However, the overall figure is thought to be much higher as those numbers do not include deaths in care homes and in the wider community.

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Now it has been confirmed that Hull City Council is examining the idea of creating a special memorial space for people to mourn loved ones lost to the virus.

An unofficial national Covid Memorial Wall on a walkway next to the River Tames in London featuring a public mural painted by volunteers has become a landmark in the capital.

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Councillor Rosie Nicola
Councillor Rosie Nicola

Councillor Rosie Nicola said a Hull version was still in its early stages.

However, the cabinet portfolio holder for environmental services said council leaders were keen for Hull to have its own memorial site.

Speaking at a full council meeting, she said: “I feel we need somewhere in the city, a public place, where can either have a physical memorial or a quiet space where all of the people from the city who have died in this awful time can be remembered quietly and lovingly.


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“I would stress it’s very early days on this and there are all sorts of ideas floating around.

“I think it ought to be central, somewhere where anyone in the area can travel to and sit quietly and remember those people who meant so much to us.

“It could be Queens Gardens and another suggestion I have had is in the green space near the History Centre.”

Cllr Nicola said many families had experienced heartbreak, not only from loved ones dying of Covid but also as a result of the many restrictions around hospital visiting and funeral services during different lockdowns.

She added: “It’s just a question of thinking about what do we want to do to remember these citizens who have played such a part in a city that we have lost in these horrible circumstances and that we have not been able to mourn.”